Street Outreach

Welcome House’s mobile homeless outreach team, called Open Door, has been active since July 11, 2017.  It is an interdisciplinary team composed of 3 members – a Kenton County/Campbell County outreach worker, a Boone County outreach worker and a Nurse Practitioner. Holistic street-based outreach has been a long standing gap that was lacking in previous iterations of outreach teams in the past. Having this understanding allows us to address not only housing, but also physical and emotional needs. Our goal is to bring emergency stabilization services to the aforementioned counties, and also plan to expand to the rural counties. The outreach team’s priority is to spend time searching for those experiencing homeless as well as to build relationships with them as we address physical and emotional needs. Another priority where the team shines is our goal of educating and connecting community resources together. The team continues to knock down barriers by negating the transportation barrier by meeting the clients where they are at in the community.

 

If you, or someone you’ve seen, is in need of the outreach team’s services, please reach out to the appropriate contact below:

 

Kenton County & Campbell County

Chris Hammann, Street Outreach Service Coordinator

859.630.3902

chammann@welcomehouseky.org

 

Boone County

JP Decker, Street Outreach Service Coordinator

859.630.1560

jpdecker@welcomehouseky.org

 

Medical Assistance

Jennifer Cline, Nurse Practitioner

859.750.3707

jcline@welcomehouseky.org

 

 

Join the Open Door – Homeless Street Outreach group on Facebook to share information if you’ve seen a homeless individual in need of assistance, and our outreach team will try to locate that person and offer our services. Click here to join the Facebook group.

 

2018 K-Count

Each year, KHC and our partners conduct the K-Count, an annual count of homeless adults and families across the state, to monitor the homeless situation in Kentucky. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) requires this count to demonstrate the need for resources for housing and services for homeless persons in each community. This year, KHC’s Executive Director blogged about his experience conducting the K-Count with Welcome House staff.

We began along a railroad track in the cold, dark, early morning. One of the volunteers with us used to be on the other side of the K-Count and came ready to give hope to the hopeless. As we shined our flashlights on tarps and tents of a homeless camp, I became more thankful for the warm bed I rolled out of a couple of hours earlier. I hoped that we wouldn’t find anyone frozen to death in the cold, dilapidated tents. The tents had varying degrees of intricacy. Some were tarps laid over a few sticks and cold dirt, while others had walls made of scrap wood, wooden pallets for a bed, and wadded-up clothes for a pillow. One tent had a couch by it in what appeared to be a makeshift living area with pictures of whom I assumed were loved ones. Surrounding trees were lined with frozen sweatshirts and jeans that had been hung out to dry. Read more>

Edwin King, Executive Director of the Kentucky Housing Corporation, along with Connor Creaghead, Amanda Couch, Danielle Amrine, and Justin Beale of Welcome House of Northern Kentucky.